Tuesday, 12 May 2020

Why maintenance is needed in an organisation and in daily life

Why maintenance is needed in an organisation and in daily life
You've been asked to serve on the Board of a local community-based organization, and you're visiting its offices for the first time. You notice that the floor doesn't seem to have been swept in months, and when the receptionist looks for a piece of paper to write down your name, he can't find one. Participants are milling around, apparently, as you hear from their conversation, because a staff member hasn't shown up for their meeting. You realize you haven't heard much about this organization from friends and acquaintances, except for rumors that it's constantly in financial difficulty; you've never seen it represented at any of the numerous community events and meetings you've attended. You've only been in the office for a minute, and you're already wondering whether you want to be associated with it.
Your impression of this organization has been colored by its apparent lack of day-to-day management. Section 1 of this chapter is intended to help you develop a management plan for your organization. But all the plans in the world won't do you any good unless you carry them out efficiently every day. The day-to-day maintenance of an organization - the nitty-gritty tasks that carry its work forward - is what really determines whether it will be successful or not.
These tasks cover not only the obvious details - getting the organization's work done each day, keeping track of money and supplies, cleaning the office - but the larger issue of relationships, both within the organization and between the organization and the community. It's been said that God is in the details, and that's just as true for managing an organization as it is for raising children or running a country.
t's beginning to look like the day-to-day maintenance of an organization requires a lot of work. Who's going to do it all? The answer to that question depends on a number of factors: the size of the organization, its structure, its geography (i.e. whether everything happens in one office or space, or whether the organization is spread out over several spaces, or even several towns), and the particular talents of its staff members.
In a smaller organization, or one that doesn't have a large administrative structure, most of the day-to-day management will probably fall on the director or coordinator. If the organization really is small - a couple of staff, one office - that's usually not a problem. If the organization is administratively understaffed, it can become a very large problem, because it can lead to a lot of the work simply not getting done. In a larger organization, or in one where the director simply can't handle everything herself, there are creative ways to ensure that everything necessary is accomplished.
  • Delegate work to other administrators. Administrative staff can split up responsibilities for day-to-day management.
  • Hire a bookkeeper/accountant. Many organizations have such a person on staff, but others may contract with an independent bookkeeper who works only a few hours a week. That way, they get the money-management services they need without having to pay more than they can afford.
  • Split day-to-day management duties among several staff members. Some people on staff may have skills in management areas, or may simply gain satisfaction from particular tasks. This solution may be especially useful in situations where parts of the organization are geographically separated.
  • Share some functions among all staff (or staff and Board) in rotation. Serving on community committees, making public presentations, cleaning up at day's end, buying the coffee - these are all tasks that could be handled in turn by many people in the organization.
  • Hire a cleaning service or other outside concern to take some of the burden
  • Share services with another organization
There are even more creative ways to get the messy stuff done. You can ask everyone to stay late and clean once a month or so, and follow the clean-up with a party. You could even invite families in and buy or chip in for pizza or something similar.
In some community-based organizations, participants help out, either as volunteers or as paid workers. You may even be able, in some circumstances, to pay them out of grant money. Other possibilities are to recruit volunteers particularly to help out with maintenance tasks, or to find a community business that's willing to give you some service in return for a tax write-off or the publicity value. While most maintenance tasks need to be done by staff members, most of the chores that fall under logistics can be delegated to someone else.
Regardless of how you parcel out the work, however, it's important that some individual - usually the director - oversees the day-to-day management. Someone has to understand the overall view of the situation, so he can intervene if there's a problem or a gap, and make sure that the functioning of the organization isn't disturbed or interrupted.
For a management plan - and the organization it sustains - to work properly, its elements have to be carried out every day. It helps to develop systems for day-to-day maintenance, and to make clear who's responsible for what. Attending to the big picture in this way is perhaps the most important daily management task of all.

TASK: Summary on “How to learn to say NO”
According to Dipika, Saying no is not an easy thing for some people. It is an art to say no an only some people have that art. Firstly, the biggest reason we are unable to say no is the fear of consequence especially in cooperate world, we worry about our career, our image. Second fear is the fear of rejection, and third fear may be of missing out, we constantly want to know what is going around yes. But it become very easy if we see it in terms of cost, benefits and access. Here the biggest cost is your time and value of yourself. Saying no at correct time will result in a better way instead just saying yes and working like a trash. How to say No? firstly you can’t be rude, and don’t lie or give excuses instead say it directly, honestly and be prepared with explanation. And say no when u are completely sure about that thing. 



https://www.linkedin.com/in/komal-agrawal-6ab714189









No comments:

Post a comment

Marketing Manager Job Description

Marketing 1) Inbound Marketing Manager Job Description If your marketing department is just starting to make the shift to an inbound a...